News flash to advertisers: Want to alienate discerning customers? Portray current customers as pretentious clowns.

Over the last few weeks I’ve started to see ads crop up for a service called Straight Talk. The one that initially grabbed my attention was that of a woman getting caught up in the background of an elderly couple’s photo moment, then mistaking them for paparazzi and shredding the film roll out of the man’s hands in a fit of self-importance. See for yourself—>

Afterwards, the screen freezes and superimposes “The ‘I now think anyone with a camera is paparazzi because I’m feeling richer’ effect.” Enters the plug for Straight Talk unlimited cell phone plans for 45 dollars a month, and I get it.

Except.

The ad leaves me with a sour taste in my mouth, and my logical next step is to ask,

“Does saving money make me identify with that behavior?”

Well, no.

“Does being rich make me identify with that behavior?”

Well, maybe.

“Does being a Straight Talk customer now align me with this ad, and subsequently this behavior?”

Yes.

Here’s the problem. I’m sure they have a great product, and now I don’t want to be their customer, because their ad campaign portrays Straight Talk customers as self important ass hats. It no longer matters if they have a good, valuable offering, because I’d rather pay twice the price to complain about AT&T than align myself with this ad.

Here’s a news flash to advertisers. Want to alienate discerning customers? Portray current customers as pretentious clowns.

Apple doesn’t even have to advertise the self congratulating airs of its customers. Everyone just knows. We’re a stuffy, slightly pretentious bunch.

I get that advertisers need to get my attention, and Straight Talk did, but I’m not sure they intended for me to furrow my brow, then have a visceral response to their ads. Subsequently, do I now want to identify with their company? Hell no.

Too much? Stepping off my soap box now.

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